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Textual Criticism


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#1 Theopneustos

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Posted 08 May 2011 - 02:30 PM

I recently watched the youtube videos on this website. If you have time please watch them and tell me what you think.

Are there any good introductory documents or books on the textual criticism of the Bible/the New Testament that you can recommend please?

#2 Kay

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 04:40 AM

I recently watched the youtube videos on this website. If you have time please watch them and tell me what you think.

Are there any good introductory documents or books on the textual criticism of the Bible/the New Testament that you can recommend please?


Thank you for the links - will have a look at them a little later ... though it looks interesting just from having a brief look.

There are two sections on this board about Textual Criticism but only brief.

I found this site of worth - giving a well rounded view of the subject for an introduction:

Comparing Translations, History of Transmission, Textual Considerations @:

http://www.cob-net.org/compare.htm

which also link to other relative sites.

Of interest is this paper:

Skeptical Trends in New Testament Textual Criticism:
Inside the Alexandrian Priority School and Why Bible Change Is Coming

http://www.all-of-gr...ticalTrends.pdf

also including a Glossary (Including Some Bibliography) also Aland's 12 Rules:

  • Only one reading can be original, however many variant readings there may be.
  • Only the reading which best satisfies the requirements of both external and internal criteria can be original.
  • Criticism of the text must always begin from the evidence of the manuscript tradition and only afterward turn to a consideration of internal criteria.
  • Internal criteria (the context of the passage, its style and vocabulary, the theological environment of the author, etc.) can never be the sole basis for a critical decision, especially when they stand in opposition to the external evidence.
  • The primary authority for a critical textual decision lies with the Greek manuscript tradition, with the versions and Fathers serving no more than a supplementary and corroborative function, particularly in passages where their underlying Greek text cannot be reconstructed with absolute certainty.
  • Furthermore, manuscripts should be weighed, not counted, and the peculiar traits of each manuscript should be duly considered. However important the early papyri, or a particular uncial, or a minuscule may be, there is no single manuscript or group of manuscripts that can be followed mechanically, even though certain combinations of witnesses may deserve a greater degree of confidence than others. Rather, decisions in textual criticism must be worked out afresh, passage by passage (the local principle).
  • The principle that the original reading may be found in any single manuscript or version when it stands alone or nearly alone is only a theoretical possibility. Any form of eclecticism which accepts this principle will hardly succeed in establishing the original text of the New Testament; it will only confirm the view of the text which it presupposes.
  • The reconstruction of a stemma of readings for each variant (the genealogical principle) is an extremely important device, because the reading which can most easily explain the derivation of the other forms is itself most likely the original.
  • Variants must never be treated in isolation, but always considered in the context of the tradition. Otherwise there is too great a danger of reconstructing a “test tube text” which never existed at any time or place.
  • There is truth in the maxim: lectio difficilior lectio potior (“the more difficult reading is the more probable reading”). But this principle must not be taken too mechanically, with the most difficult reading (lectio difficilima) adopted as original simply because of its degree of difficulty.
  • The venerable maxim lectio brevior lectio potior (“the shorter reading is the more probable reading”) is certainly right in many instances. But here again the principle cannot be applied mechanically.
  • A constantly maintained familiarity with New Testament manuscripts themselves is the best training for textual criticism. In textual criticism the pure theoretician has often done more harm than good.
(Kurt Aland and Barbara Aland, The Text of the New Testament [Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995], pp. 275-276.)

If you have Libronix - Logos Software - there are various introductions to Textual Criticism available at a reasonable cost (any are of them are reasonable introduction):

Introduction to Textual Criticism

These books would also be available in hard copy from Booksellers.

Also, @ Bible.org - there are quite a number of articles available:

Textual Criticism

Trust this is presently sufficient for subject introduction.
"seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness" Matthew 6:33

#3 Theopneustos

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 09:54 AM

Excellent, thank you very much!




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