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Exhortation - Brother Shane Kirkwood - 30 July 2006


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#1 Kay

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:08 AM

Exhortation - Punchbowl Ecclesia NSW

Brother Shane Kirkwood

30 July 2006

Reading - Romans 6

Romans 6:1-23 (NET)

The Believer’s Freedom from Sin’s Domination

6:1 What shall we say then? Are we to remain in sin so that grace may increase? 6:2 Absolutely not! How can we who died to sin still live in it? 6:3 Or do you not know that as many as were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? 6:4 Therefore we have been buried with him through baptism into death, in order that just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too may live a new life.1

6:5 For if we have become united with him in the likeness of his death, we will certainly also be united in the likeness of his resurrection.2 6:6 We know that3 our old man was crucified with him so that the body of sin would no longer dominate us,4 so that we would no longer be enslaved to sin. 6:7 (For someone who has died has been freed from sin.)5

6:8 Now if we died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. 6:9 We know6 that since Christ has been raised from the dead, he is never going to die7 again; death no longer has mastery over him. 6:10 For the death he died, he died to sin once for all, but the life he lives, he lives to God. 6:11 So you too consider yourselves8 dead to sin, but9 alive to God in Christ Jesus.

6:12 Therefore do not let sin reign in your mortal body so that you obey its desires, 6:13 and do not present your members to sin as instruments10 to be used for unrighteousness,11 but present yourselves to God as those who are alive from the dead and your members to God as instruments12 to be used for righteousness. 6:14 For sin will have no mastery over you, because you are not under law but under grace.

The Believer’s Enslavement to God’s Righteousness

6:15 What then? Shall we sin because we are not under law but under grace? Absolutely not! 6:16 Do you not know that if you present yourselves13 as obedient slaves,14 you are slaves of the one you obey, either of sin resulting in death, or obedience resulting in righteousness?15 6:17 But thanks be to God that though you were slaves to sin, you obeyed16 from the heart that pattern17 of teaching you were entrusted to, 6:18 and having been freed from sin, you became enslaved to righteousness. 6:19 (I am speaking in human terms because of the weakness of your flesh.)18 For just as you once presented your members as slaves to impurity and lawlessness leading to more lawlessness, so now present your members as slaves to righteousness leading to sanctification. 6:20 For when you were slaves of sin, you were free with regard to righteousness.

6:21 So what benefit19 did you then reap20 from those things that you are now ashamed of? For the end of those things is death. 6:22 But now, freed21 from sin and enslaved to God, you have your benefit22 leading to sanctification, and the end is eternal life. 6:23 For the payoff23 of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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1tn Grk “may walk in newness of life,” in which ζωῆς (zwhs) functions as an attributed genitive (see ExSyn 89-90, where this verse is given as a prime example).

2tn Grk “we will certainly also of his resurrection.”

3tn Grk “knowing this, that.” Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation.

4tn Grk “may be rendered ineffective, inoperative,” or possibly “may be destroyed.” The term καταργέω (katargew) has various nuances. In Rom 7:2 the wife whose husband has died is freed from the law (i.e., the law of marriage no longer has any power over her, in spite of what she may feel). A similar point seems to be made here (note v. 7).

5sn Verse 7 forms something of a parenthetical comment in Paul’s argument.

6tn Grk “knowing.” Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation.

7tn The present tense here has been translated as a futuristic present (see ExSyn 536, where this verse is listed as an example).

8tc ‡ Some Alexandrian and Byzantine mss (Ì94vid א* B C 81 365 1506 1739 1881 pc) have the infinitive “to be” (εἶναι, einai) following “yourselves”. The infinitive is lacking from some mss of the Alexandrian and Western texttypes (Ì46vid A D*,c F G 33vid pc). The infinitive is found elsewhere in the majority of Byzantine mss, suggesting a scribal tendency toward clarification. The lack of infinitive best explains the rise of the other readings. The meaning of the passage is not significantly altered by inclusion or omission, but on internal grounds omission is more likely. NA27 includes the infinitive in brackets, indicating doubt as to its authenticity.

9tn Greek emphasizes the contrast between these two clauses more than can be easily expressed in English.

10tn Or “weapons, tools.”

11tn Or “wickedness, injustice.”

12tn Or “weapons, tools.”

13tn Grk “to whom you present yourselves.”

14tn Grk “as slaves for obedience.” See the note on the word “slave” in 1:1.

15tn Grk “either of sin unto death, or obedience unto righteousness.”

16tn Grk “you were slaves of sin but you obeyed.”

17tn Or “type, form.”

18tn Or “because of your natural limitations” (NRSV).

sn Verse 19 forms something of a parenthetical comment in Paul’s argument.

19tn Grk “fruit.”

20tn Grk “have,” in a tense emphasizing their customary condition in the past.

21tn The two aorist participles translated “freed” and “enslaved” are causal in force; their full force is something like “But now, since you have become freed from sin and since you have become enslaved to God….”

22tn Grk “fruit.”

23tn A figurative extension of ὀψώνιον (oywnion), which refers to a soldier’s pay or wages. Here it refers to the end result of an activity, seen as something one receives back in return. In this case the activity is sin, and the translation “payoff” captures this thought. See also L&N 89.42.

Biblical Studies Press: The NET Bible First Edition; Bible. English. NET Bible.; The NET Bible. Biblical Studies Press, 2006; 2006, S. Ro 6:1-23
"seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness" Matthew 6:33

#2 Kay

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:11 AM

"It is nice to be with you here.

The NT Readings at the moment are going through Romans. Paul in today’s readings in Chapter 5-6 says 5: 6-8 “greater love has no man than this that he laid down his life for his friends”, but Paul says here Jesus died for us while we were sinners. So for all of us – Jesus Christ became our very best friend – he died for us.

It is easy to read this without thinking about the power of what Paul is saying here. It means, if he is our closest friend we should love him like no-one else. What would we do if he came into the hall this morning? It is an interesting thing to think how we would act – the doorman would shake his hand, somebody maybe greeting him and talking about the meaning of “agape” – perhaps we wouldn’t know what to say – I don’t think I would know what to say, many of us would prefer to stand up the back and hope that we never actually had to speak to him, to say something. Maybe some of us would fall at his feet, I guess how we responded to him as an individual would depend on how we felt at the time – about ourself, our service and how our life was going at the time. Paul talks about this feeling and about the love that Jesus and the Father showed us says “who shall separate us from the love of Christ?” – and he lists things “tribulation, distress, persecution, famine, sword?” – for us in the 20th century we could add other things that might separate us from his love – they might be different things to the sword, famine, persecution – but there are other things in our life that come between us and our relationship with Christ. “In all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us – I am persuaded that neither death, life, principalities, power, things present, things in the future, height, depth, any creature will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord – the man who died for us.”
"seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness" Matthew 6:33

#3 Kay

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:12 AM

"His love is constant – what happened to our love? We get caught up in the daily demands of our life, the circumstances we are in come between us and our saviour – we lose discipline, we get involved in the world around, prayers and readings become a routine, we lose spiritual motivation – we become practical, we follow a set pattern and we can become distant from the truth about Jesus who gave his life for us and is our saviour – we can put on a show of great behaviour, but underneath our life is automatic, routine. Think about the week we have had this week – I feel my life has been running on automatic – it is ruled by clocks, traffic, mobile phones, fax machines. All automatic things. Somehow these intrude in our life and we become automatic in our response to things. Think about the mechanical and the practical and the formal. When we think about the question of choosing between Jesus Christ as a saviour and Caiaphas the high priest. In the days of Israel – Caiaphas was the high priest, but the real high priest was Jesus. People’s lives were running on automatic – if we put the two of them here this morning – Caiaphas would stand here with his robes, he would have an air of dignity, dedication, formality. He was dedicated to the nation, the temple, he was maintaining the structure of the nation. Better for one man to die than for the whole nation to perish. He looks right, appears right, sounds right with his arguments and power. Alongside him we put Jesus of Nazareth – we see a man in a simple robe, after he had been maltreated by the Jews and the Romans would appear battered, bruised, bloodied, covered in spit. Behold the man – Pilate said. Who would you choose as a high priest. Which one? Which one is touch with the “feelings of our infirmities” – was it Caiaphas with his position of power and dignity, or the man who had been humiliated and assaulted in public. We know the answer to this – we have a high priest who was touched with the feelings of our infirmities.
"seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness" Matthew 6:33

#4 Kay

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:12 AM

"Think about Paul before his conversion – he thought he had made the right decision – his choice between Caiaphas and Jesus – he had chosen Caiaphas, the law, the temple, the power, the reputation. Caiaphas was a very religious man and so was the apostle Paul. But underneath there was a doubt, a fear that he didn’t really believe in what he was doing. Have you ever lived a life like that? A doubt that you don’t really believe what you are doing. He “breathed out threatenings and slaughter” – he lived in an atmosphere of violence, it was all about him – he was a sinner. 1 Timothy says “I was the chief of sinners” – he was consumed with violence, he took men and dragged them to prison because they had chosen to serve a different high priest. He had letters of authority when he travelled to Damascus and was going to make sure these people understood they had made the wrong choice. But he was turned completed around from serving the law, the temple, Caiaphas and he was turned to serve the battered and bruised saviour. How did he do it? What changed to produce this enormous result in Paul’s life? In Rom 6 he tells us. V2. The heading of Chapter 6 could be “dead men don’t sin”. But there is a contradiction in what Paul is going to tell us v3-4 He is saying we are dead to sin, we are serving a new master – not the old master any more. I have been freed from sin, he says. How? V5-6 this is the key point, this is what changed his life dramatically, “our old man” – what was Paul’s old man – the man that had run around, violent, dragging people to prison, living threatenings and slaughter, he says that sinful old man is crucified with him – the him is in italics – we take it to mean “crucified with Jesus”. How did this happen? What is he saying here? That old man of rebellion was nailed to the cross. “crucified with” = only 5 times in the NT – here, 3 times in the gospels Matthew 27:44, Mark 15:32, John 19:32 – it is referring to the crucifixion – the crucifixion. What did we have there? 3 crosses – who were on the crosses, Jesus in the middle and two others, both of them were sinners, malefactors, thieves – one on the left and one on the right. They were crucified with him – they actually saw Jesus, this was a real thing for them. There they were on their crosses crucified next to the saviour. What did the 3 crosses represent? Rebellion, repentance, redemption. Initially the men on the two crosses on either side represented rebellion because they both didn’t believe in Jesus to start with, but eventually one of them repented – they were crucified with Jesus. The other occurrence of “crucified with” is Galatians 2:19-20 and it is the same phrase as in Romans 6:6 – Paul says “I am crucified with Christ” – the phrase means “together with Christ” – next to him, this is a contradiction because Paul says he was crucified together with Christ – he saw himself on a cross next to Jesus Christ, he could see him face to face, he represented rebellion in his life, but he is crucified with him. “nevertheless I life” – on one hand he says he is crucified with Jesus, but then he says he lives. How can a crucified person live? They are drawing their life from another – if his old life has died and his old man has died (that was living in rebellion against Christ) then he can only be drawing his life from somewhere else. Christ lives in him – the life that he lives in the flesh is not the same life, it is different, the life he lives now is not motivated by sin but by righteousness – he has emptied himself of sin and is full of life through the love of Christ who gave himself for him. Paul couldn’t believe this, he thought it was amazing that Jesus Christ had given himself for a man who was a sinner. It was an amazing realisation that encouraged Paul to love his Lord and to do anything for him. When did Jesus love Paul? When he was Saul of Tarsus – that is what Paul says in Romans, when he was Saul and breathing out threatenings and slaughter, the Saviour loved him because he had already given his life for him. Paul wasn’t living his life so that Jesus would love him, he was living his life because Jesus had already loved him. One of our biggest failings is to live our life so that Jesus will love us – we think if we do this and that, and if we are good Jesus will love us. This is not what Paul is saying, he says “I live my life like this because Jesus has already loved us and given his life for us” – we keep thinking we have to make up the debt, we think we have to earn Jesus loves but this is wrong – Jesus already loves us and has given himself for us. So everything Paul did in his life was a response to the love of Jesus.
"seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness" Matthew 6:33

#5 Kay

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:13 AM

"I struggle with this like all of us – we go through this process every day. Paul had to empty himself and surrender himself to the love of Jesus Christ – shown in his sacrifice. He said “since I have done that and because he has done that for me, now I live a different life, I am a changed man”. When you go to the crucifixion – the events of that day – we find Jesus died first – the reason was he had given his life – the other two thieves were trying to hang on to life. The soldiers came and broke the legs of the two thieves – they would shatter all the bones in their legs so they could not lift themselves up so they could breath, then they would die because they couldn’t push themselves up and they would suffocate on the cross. The legs are a symbol in the Bible of strength – the strength of a man – they are the strongest muscles in the body – “God doesn’t delight in the strength of a horse and takes no pleasure in the legs of a man, but he takes pleasure in those that fear him” – God is looking for people that don’t rely on their own strength, but on God’s strength – think about Jacob when he wrestled with the angel, finally Jacob had to rely on God. Paul who was the persecutor of the believers had his legs taken from underneath him, he fell to the ground, he looked up when the voice asked him “Saul why do you persecute me” Who are you Lord? He asks. I am Jesus who you persecute. So Paul’s legs in a sense on that day were broken. He accepted the fact that never again would he serve the master of sin through his own strength. In all the world only one man never had his legs broken – that was the saviour, who learned obedience by the things he suffered, he leaned not on his own understanding – he didn’t lean on himself. Of all the people that had strength and power – he never leant on his own strength, but on his father’s understanding – he trusted his father day by day it was a struggle, but he chose his father’s way and learned obedience by the things he suffered. All of us will have our legs broken, most will have their legs broken and never recover they will die never having learnt to surrender to God, never knowing what sort of relationship they could have if they accepted Jesus as their saviour, but to us we have had our legs broken. Why? Because we try and do everything through our own strength – God tells us to rely on him, not on ourselves. So each Sunday we come to remember the sacrifice of the Lord and to learn to trust in him not in ourselves. We must examine ourselves before we take the bread and wine. We all walk with a limp, this is a symbol – we serve a new master we don’t serve sin. We think what we have done this week – we have trusted in ourselves we have made our own choices – we can’t live our own life but let Christ live in us. This morning as we look at the emblems we know we have spent a good portion of the week trusting in ourselves, but there is no success in this – there is only failure – there is no future, there is no Christ living in us. Prov 28:13 “he who covers his sin will not prosper but he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy” – we must reflect and confess and forsake sin – acknowledge we need a covering for our sin.
"seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness" Matthew 6:33

#6 Kay

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:14 AM

"Go back to the events of the crucifixion and the 3 men that were crucified, we think about the words of Paul in Rom 5 that we started with v6 – think about this in the context of the crucifixion v7 – when we come to the crucifixion what do we have? 2 thieves, sinners. Which one of us would have volunteered to be nailed to the middle cross to save those two men? If we stood at the foot of the cross and they were asking for someone to come up and volunteer to lay down their life to save those two men. Any one that would do that would be a fool we would think – they were sinners, thieves – you wouldn’t lay down your life to save them. But Jesus did – he died for sinners. We are in that position, they represent us. Jesus died for both of those men, the one on the right and the one on the left and everyone else as well. Amazingly one of them went from being a rebel to repenting. You wouldn’t believe that. The other man had the opportunity but he didn’t take it. When they took those two bodies down they looked the same. If you laid them out there were two sinners, both had broken legs, both had been crucified and you couldn’t tell the difference between them – sinners who had been caught. One of them in a short time went from being a servant of sin to a servant of righteousness. That is an amazing thing. Paul says in Romans “we go from servants of sin to servants of righteousness when we choose to be crucified with the saviour” – he chose that, not initially but in the space of the crucifixion he changed from the servant of sin to a servant of the saviour. He changed sides. One of those men will rise up and walk in newness of life – he didn’t get the opportunity to serve in this life but he will in the next life. For us this morning as we examine ourselves we must think about who we serve. Is it the Lord who laid down his life, the one we see as being crucified alongside of, or do we serve ourselves? “God be merciful to me a sinner” – perhaps all of us can echo the words of the man who said “Lord remember me when you come into your kingdom”."
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"seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness" Matthew 6:33

#7 sarah

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:24 AM

thank you for this one Kay. Its a coincidence! I was just posting a question up about Romans 7 when you were posting this! thanks!

#8 Martyn

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 04:15 PM

Looks like Bro. Shane's ahead of his time.

#9 sarah

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 04:26 PM

hehe...or he and i are thinking along the same wavelength? or perhaps thats not what you are meaning at all?

#10 Martyn

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 06:12 PM

I meant this:

Exhortation - Punchbowl Ecclesia NSW

Brother Shane Kirkwood

30 July 2006

:w00t:

#11 sarah

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:04 PM

hehe I getcha now :-)




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