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How long is a "generation"?

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#1 iamkalah

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 08:55 PM

Is there really a set amount of years?
Can it be talking of people or a race?


And now, Israel, what does the Lord your God ask of you but to fear the Lord your God, to walk in obedience to him, to love him, to serve the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul, and to observe the Lord’s commands and decrees that I am giving you today for your own good? – Deuteronomy 10:12-13 (NIV)

#2 firstthings1st

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 09:12 PM

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Generation , We also generally accept that the length of a generation in earlier periods of history was closer to 20 years when humans mated younger and life expectancies.

Other speculations about the length of a generation include 70 years, 100 years or even 40 years because that is how long the Israelites wandered. http://www.rapturere...faq/faq244.html ,  generation ago it was 20 years.Long answer: It depends on what you mean by generation. In US-biased Western.https://www.google.c...s a generation?


Edited by firstthings1st, 23 May 2014 - 09:36 PM.

Walter and Debbie, http://1stthingsfirst.ieasysite.com/

#3 Kay

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 03:47 AM

iamkalah (welcome to the Forum :))

 

Just following on from comments and links made by firstthing1st ... the following may also be of assistance to you (from a Biblical perspective) and discusses aspects of both time and race (people):
 

GENERATION. A word used in the EVV to translate various biblical terms.
 
1. Heb. tôleḏôṯ. A word occurring ten times in Genesis 2:4; 5:1; 6:9; 10:1; 11:10, 27; 25:12, 19; 36:1; 37:2 in such a way as to divide it into eleven sections, each being styled ‘the generations of …’ It also occurs in Gn. 10:32; 25:13; 36:9; Ex. 6:16, 19; Nu. 1 many times; 3:1; Ru. 4:18; 1 Ch. 1:29; 5:7; 7:2, 4, 9; 8:28; 9:9, 34; 26:31. In Ex. 28:10 the EVV translate it ‘birth’. The word is formed from yālaḏ, ‘to bear, beget’, and this probably accounts for the E.T. ‘generation’. From its OT usage, however, it is apparent that the word means ‘history’ or ‘genealogical history’, of a family or the like. In the LXX the word is often rendered by Gk. genesis (see 3, below), and the expression biblos geneseōs Iēsou Christou, book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ’ in Mt. 1:1, closely reflects sēp̱er tôleḏôṯ ’āḏām, ‘book of the genealogy of Adam’, in Gn. 5:1.
 
2. Heb. dôr. A word occurring frequently, which corresponds in general to the word ‘generation’ as commonly understood in Eng. It can refer to a generation, as a period in the past (Is. 51:9) or future (Ex. 3:15), or to the men of a generation (Ex. 1:6). It is the word used in Gn. 17:7, 9, where God’s covenant with Abraham and his descendants is announced. The word is also used to refer to a class of men, as in ‘crooked generations’ (Dt. 32:5) or ‘generation of the righteous’ (Ps. 14:5). The Aram. cognate, dār, occur; in Dn. 4:3, 34. Akkad. duru is used of a generation as grandfather to grandson spanning about 70 years.
 
3. Gk. genesis. Used chiefly in the LXX for tôleḏôṯ and employed in the same sense in Mt. 1:1 (see 1, above). In the other NT occurrences, however, it is used in the sense of ‘birth’ (Mt. 1:18; Lk. 1:14; Jas. 1:23, ‘his natural face’, lit. ‘face of his birth’; Jas. 3:6, ‘cycle of nature’, lit. ‘course of birth’).
 
4. Gk. genea. Used chiefly in the LXX to translate dôr, and like it including among its meanings much the same range as Eng. ‘generation’. It is used of the people living at a given time (Mt. 11:16), and, by extension, of the time itself (Lk. 1:50). It is also evidently used to designate the components of a genealogy (Mt. 1:17).
 
5. Gk. gennēma, ‘child’ and ‘off-spring’, occurring in Mt. 3:7; 12:34; 23:33; Lk. 3:7, in each case in the phrase ‘brood of vipers’, AV ‘generation of vipers’.
 
6. Gk. genos, ‘race’. AV translates the phrase genos eklekton in 1 Pet. 2:9 ‘chosen generation’, but RV ‘elect race’ or RSV ‘chosen race’ is to be preferred.
 
It is sometimes held that a period of 40 years, the duration, for instance, of the wilderness wanderings, is to be taken as a round *NUMBER indicating a generation.
 
BIBLIOGRAPHY. P. J. Wiseman, Clues to Creation in Genesis, 1977, pp. 34–45; F. Büchsel, TDNT 1, pp. 662–663, 672, 682–685; R. R. Wilson, Genealogy and History in the Biblical World, 1977, pp. 158–159, n. 57; R. Morgenthaler, C. Brown, NIDNTT 2, pp. 35–39.
 
Mitchell, T. C. (1996). Generation. In (D. R. W. Wood, I. H. Marshall, A. R. Millard, J. I. Packer, & D. J. Wiseman, Eds.)New Bible dictionary. Leicester, England; Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

"seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness" Matthew 6:33

#4 birdy

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 09:52 AM

How long is a "generation"?

 

Thanks for your question. Matthew 24:34 is the verse that confuses the most people with this word 'generation'. Jesus said, "Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass, till all these things be fulfilled."

People sometimes think that the early Christians were confused when they wrote the Bible and thought that the kingdom of God would come so soon that only less than a lifespan (a generation) was required to see it. However, the Bible's author is the Holy Spirit and the Holy Spirit is not confused. What the verse actually is saying is that the evil group or type of people typified by many of the religious persons of Jesus' day would continue to exist right on through the tribulation period until those things of the period mentioned in Matthew 24 were fulfilled. That means that the church age simply continued with this same type of people, namely those who were religious but did not receive Jesus in reality. 



#5 matthew giles

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 01:15 AM

How long is a "generation"?

 

Thanks for your question. Matthew 24:34 is the verse that confuses the most people with this word 'generation'. Jesus said, "Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass, till all these things be fulfilled."

People sometimes think that the early Christians were confused when they wrote the Bible and thought that the kingdom of God would come so soon that only less than a lifespan (a generation) was required to see it. However, the Bible's author is the Holy Spirit and the Holy Spirit is not confused. What the verse actually is saying is that the evil group or type of people typified by many of the religious persons of Jesus' day would continue to exist right on through the tribulation period until those things of the period mentioned in Matthew 24 were fulfilled. That means that the church age simply continued with this same type of people, namely those who were religious but did not receive Jesus in reality. 

 

not to cause a debate, but i thought the "generation" in matthew 24:34 was referring to gentile rule as in luke 21:24

 

And they shall fall by the edge of the sword, and shall be led away captive into all nations: and Jerusalem shall be trodden down of the Gentiles, until the times (generation) of the Gentiles be fulfilled. 


Also to the OP, as stated above, generation in scripture means many different times, as like many other topics must be taken in the context of what is written before and after.

the same can be said about days, weeks, years and times.
 






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